Author Topic: N/A Spark Plug Change (have fun)  (Read 2642 times)

May 22, 2012, 01:56:04 PM
Read 2642 times

Stev0

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Taken from http://www.subaruforester.org/vbulletin/f66/n-spark-plug-replacement-anal-55431/

Yes I am extremely anal when it comes to this stuff.

First Impressions:
1.   First time is gonna' be long
2.  Do the passenger side first bc  after you remove the air filter  housing..room is abundant.  This will make it easier and make the driver  side easier (for your first time).
3.  Remove the air filter housing.  Although I removed the Battery . it is NOT necessary
4.  Changing plugs at 30K miles is nowhere necessary.  But its good to do bc they will come out easier next time.
5. Have two 3" extensions ready on the driver side.  You need to put the socket in in two steps (probably)
6.  Do the job when the  engine is cold.
7.  Be prepared for a skinned knuckle or two
8.  Its unlikely you will be able to use a torque wrench on the driver's   side.  Passenger's side probably you will be able to use one.

I have done several dozen plug changes in 45+ years and I would rate this as a '6' or '7' difficulty comparatively.

WRITEUP
 
Tools:

1.  5/8" Spark Plug Socket
2.  two  3" extensions. (Driver side)
3. 8" to 10" extension (Passenger side).
4. Short handle ratchet (especially for driver's side)
5.  12 mm socket  (Air Filter Housing hold-down bolts)
6.  8mm socket  (Hose clamp -Air filter Duct to Housing)
7..Duct tape (Taping extensions/socket together)
8..Sharp Knife (Cutting away Duck Tape :) ) (or slashing your wrists-j/k)
9. Rubber Hose (Sucking/blowing debris out of spark plughole)
10.  Anti-seize (Plug Thread * )
11. Dialectic Silicon Gel (Plug boots/Plug insulator)
11.  Various Cleaning Supplies, flashlight, mirror, bandages, Whiskey, Beer, etc.
12. New Plugs
13. Ohm Resistance Meter (Optional)

Procedure:

*  Gather up all tools ahead of time..make sure you are in the mood for this job.
*  Do passenger side first.
* Insure car is cold.
* Remove air filter element
* Break connection where duct hose engages filter housing.
* Duct Tape upper filter housing toward the the fire Wall  (so its out of way)
* Remove Lower bolts for lower filter housing (two- 12 mm).  10" extension is nice here.
* Housing may stick to lower mounting bolts-break free.
* Pull lower housing away from fender (air inlet) - remove from compartment.



* This is what you should be dealing with:



* Loosen guides for spark plug wires so you have flexibility in the wires.
* Grab the rubber handle on the boot and attempt to rotate the boot say 45 degrees in both directions.
*  I'm not really sure rotating breaks it free at boot.  Might be a waste of time.
* DO NOT PULL ON WIRE !
* Grab Boot at handle or anywhere except wire and Pull like hell..It may be ugly. :(
* Take piece of rubber hose, insert in hole and blow out debris.
* Tape 5/8" socket to 10 extension and put in hole and engage plug. (Insure you are engaged.



*  Break Plug free and loosen very slowly.  If it sticks go count clockwise and then counterclockwise in small increments
*  Someone previously indicated spray brake cleaner for sticking plug (with extension spray tube).
*  Remove plug, use hose to again blow out hole.
*  Clean threads on old plug, lube with anti-seize* and run totally  home using hand (no wrench)
*  Lube new plug anti-seize* and use dialectic liberally on insulator.
*  Run plug totally to seat using no wrench.  Insure several times that it is seated.
*  Torque to spec. (15.6 lbs)  I used less ...(11 ft. lbs)  With Anti Sieze
* The manual says to use 1/3 less torque when using anti-sieze.  So that's about 11 ft. lbs
* The  the correct torque will be 3/4  of a turn after "hand" contact
*  Lube around housing and boot seal with dialectic.
*  If you are going to check Resistance in Plug wires do it now
**  Should be 9 to 16 Ohms.  Use dialectic when reinstalling boots on supply end of wire.
*  Push boot on plugs and 'feel' engagement.
*  Repeat with other Plug.
* Reinstall Air filter Housing and filter.

*** Driver's side: (Battery removal not necessary)



*  Utilize 3" extensions..tape one extension to socket.
*  For removal, if extensions come apart its not a big problem you can push them together even if in hole.
*  For installation, it the socket sticks to plug and the extensions come apart.  You may  need to:
*** Remove plug or
***Put a hook on a piece of wire and hook the pieces out (I needed to do this)
*  Its unlikely that you will be able to use a torque wrench.  Develop  feel on Passenger Side ones. ( approx just about 3/4 turn after hand  seating)

Other suggestions/Problems:

* Do two plugs and test drive, After cooling, do the other two,
* I didn't intend to do the job but after I pulled  2 plugs I went and  bought Autolites  bc NGK not available.  Second time used NGK
* There is controversy about using anti-seize.  I used  it this time.  I used 11 ft lbs with a small bit of anti-seize but  later found: (from Subaru)   Use 1/3 less torque with thread  lubricant..11 ft lbs  
* If you disconnect the battery, vehicle will not start on first try.  Should start on second try.


If anyone thinks of other things, I'll add them

Oh..here's how the plugs looked after 31K miles

Jeep Commander CRD - GDE Hot Tune
ex Prodrive Xt, X, XT, WRX STI, Outback 3.0R

May 22, 2012, 03:37:09 PM
Reply #1

Forester Gump

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well done Steve, I enjoy informative articles. Duct tape for the skinned knuckles.

November 08, 2016, 09:16:57 PM
Reply #2

Durbanboy

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An invaluble tool in anyones toolbox is a magnetic pick-up tool.

Especially handy when working around the radiator area so as not to have to remove the sump guard if you drop a nut or bolt. Also good to remove spark plugs after you've unscrewed them if you don't have a rubber insert in your plug socket.

November 10, 2016, 03:19:28 PM
Reply #3

Dene

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Steve I had a laugh when you wrote DON'T PULL ON THE WIRE...because I did and it cost  me a new plug lead , said a few choice words to myself. :-[

November 11, 2016, 08:39:21 AM
Reply #4

Stev0

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Steve I had a laugh when you wrote DON'T PULL ON THE WIRE...because I did and it cost  me a new plug lead , said a few choice words to myself. :-[


aiiii :(
Jeep Commander CRD - GDE Hot Tune
ex Prodrive Xt, X, XT, WRX STI, Outback 3.0R

November 21, 2016, 03:46:57 PM
Reply #5

berndp

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Note that that article refers to driver/passenger side, which would probably be reversed for our cars. (LHD vs RHD)

I found that a 3/8" drive socket set works best.

That antiseize issue: Copper slip seems to be not a very good conductor. The ground "terminal" of the sparkplug is the thread, so you want good conductivity there. just saying.

Don't know why you shou drive the car between doing 1 side and the next, unless you need to kill a lot of time?
( Do two plugs and test drive, After cooling, do the other two,)

Where does one get this Dielectric grease( and what is it?) these guys are talking about on the foreign forums?
Subaru Forester 2005 2.5 Xsel
Always looking for a tar free "road"
Brackenfell, W'Cape

November 21, 2016, 05:57:31 PM
Reply #6

Durbanboy

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Note that that article refers to driver/passenger side, which would probably be reversed for our cars. (LHD vs RHD)

I found that a 3/8" drive socket set works best.

That antiseize issue: Copper slip seems to be not a very good conductor. The ground "terminal" of the sparkplug is the thread, so you want good conductivity there. just saying.

Don't know why you shou drive the car between doing 1 side and the next, unless you need to kill a lot of time?
( Do two plugs and test drive, After cooling, do the other two,)

Where does one get this Dielectric grease( and what is it?) these guys are talking about on the foreign forums?

Copperslip is used by many AME's on spark plugs in aircraft engines due to the high heat generated in the cylinder heads. I have used it many times in aircraft and cars and never had a problem. The tolerances between threads are small enough to allow for good grounding/earthing. Ever broken a plug in a cylinder head due to no lube?

A good di-electric grease is DC4/ Dow-Corning 4. If you can find it. It is non-conductive as is Vaseline. Don't want the oldlady shooting out sparks now do we ;)

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Silicone_grease

December 01, 2016, 11:07:23 PM
Reply #7

berndp

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Subaru Forester 2005 2.5 Xsel
Always looking for a tar free "road"
Brackenfell, W'Cape